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Modern family season 5 torrent 21.12.2020

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What I liked most about working with Paul is that I learnt so much from the way he approached music, which was the totally opposite way of my schooled approach. Paul taught me so much more than school ever did, I once said in some awards show. And those words ring true all Ahmad Izham Omar 31 the time.

I repaid the favour by playing keyboards for his productions and getting involved in arrangements and co-writing a little with him but that was nothing compared to what I learnt from him. We both knew we had to work really hard to make sure the music sounded fresh and different and unlike anything anyone has heard before.

That would be our unique selling proposition, as business-types would like to say. Normal music industry folk would have thought that was a waste of time. But I thought it was necessary if we wanted to hit Malaysia with a sound that was miles above what anybody else was doing. You see, we were not in it just as a business. We were in it because we wanted to bring something new from all of these great young talents that we were hearing in the scene.

We just had to find a way to make it work and to balance it all, combining financial returns with spending what was considered excessive times on perfecting the product. But I knew this was the right way. We all knew. When you combine business discipline and marketing creativity with a passionate respect to music sincerity and production quality, you could have a real chance of not just making a real hit, but making a real difference.

And for us, that meant everything. The early years were tough. No one really understood what we were trying to do. No one……. The fans gave us strength and belief to try something new all the time. The TV stations only showcased huge mainstream acts. From sticking flyers on toilet walls to being chased by mall security guards for giving out flyers to shoppers to organizing gigs we did all we could to get the music out directly to the fans.

Even with all the hardship we kept on going. I remember looking at the hopeful faces of the artists for their future and how we all just kept it all going even though we had no idea when the next batch of funds will come. And boy did we keep on going. We did all we could, fueled by passion and little else, with no expectations on sales and no idea what the future would be for our tiny little label. The orders suddenly started coming in. It was just me and Paul and with Paul always in the studio, I had to figure out how to do invoices, purchase orders, work with the printers, get the products out to our independent distributor and then do it all over again when the next order arrived.

I took on Yogi B from Poetic Ammo to help me. I also took in another guy called Azmi Abdul Rahman to help. It was a motley crue of sorts. When OAG hit platinum, it was as if we had hit on something. We never knew what the market was like for something like OAG, because Ahmad Izham Omar 33 there had been no precedent.

And once it hit platinum, we knew we had hit on some nerve. It was as if we were riding on the crest of some tipping-point of the Malaysian independent music scene. The music fans wanted something new, something exciting, something different, and only due to our love for doing something new and exciting that we gave them exactly what they wanted.

Innuendo won a record 6 AIM awards which was a major feat considering that English albums were not allowed to compete on many AIM categories. There was once when Radhi got into one of his moods and decided to use a marker pen and wrote angry messages on the walls. And there was once I had to withdraw all my money from my savings to pay royalties for all the artists when the company funds were not in yet. This is tough. The next few years were the golden years of Positive Tone.

With the influx of revenues, we managed to hire more staff. With the help of these new colleagues, we developed our own work processes and even broke new ground in creative marketing and working with sponsors. Well, we had no choice but to be creative as we usually had extremely small budgets. Our culture was beginning to be more solid and more established. Our music videos became the standard for all music video productions in Malaysia. A lot of artists from other labels would complain to their labels how Positive Tone, a tiny label, could make amazing music videos.

The answer was actually quite simple. Ahmad Izham Omar 34 Whilst other companies spent on advertising on TV, radio, print, buses, etc, we just spent on music videos. And even then sometimes it was produced cheaply by a sympathetic production house who loved our music. And with our focus on urban and progressive music, we became the favourites of sponsors which then helped with our roadshow and advertising costs. It all worked out great and all due to our singular mission.

We set ourselves apart from the beginning and it was beginning to pay off. We had great fun at our office in Kelana Jaya. Yes, sometimes it would rain so hard that our roof gave way and everyone had to quickly move the computers from the rain but it was our home. We did all we can to make it a fun place to work. We did all we can to make it home. We received a lot of demos, wished we could do more with all of them, but wisely chose to work with only the most promising ones.

Sometimes I got it wrong. After one hearing from a Singaporean guy, I threw his demo into the dustbin. When EMI became our parent, we got more professional in our operations. We moved into new offices, finally had e-mail, and our computers worked faster. But our love for urban and progressive music never wavered. That remained strong and true. And of course, Too Phat defined the millennium for Positive Tone.

The collaboration with Warren G showed that a little label can indeed work wonders. Others might say that he was too much of a perfectionist, I say that he was someone I learnt a lot from. Ahmad Izham Omar 35 Even though we were all on our own in the early years, after a while the industry gave us recognition and support. There were so many more individuals who helped and I am indebted to every single one of them.

I have to say that I was also lucky to have met so many great artists. They were not just great but they were all different. They were all original. And they all had amazing passion. When Reymee, Sam, Pot and Taj got together, they had a sound that no other group can get until now. Yogi B had this manic attention to detail. Malique and Joe shook the nation like no other.

You could just sing along to Nice Stupid Playground and smile. There were many others we met along the way, everyone talented in their very own way. Even my brother Ikram came and help whenever he could, such was his love for the company that we all created. It was like we had our own home, our own culture, our own way of doing things. We were small but we fought hard. These guys were the life of Positive Tone. They gave it a soul, a character, a home. The true secret was that we not only made urban and progressive music BUT aim to ensure its appeal to mainstream audiences without losing its urban and progressive values.

That was why PT was what it was. It never just made music for the core urban audiences. It tried to showcase it for everyone to enjoy. And what a journey it had in its Ahmad Izham Omar 36 efforts. Until today, as I sit and mull over the many financial statements I have to pore through and the many long-winded meetings I have to attend to in my current job in the world of broadcasting, I think back to those days in Positive Tone and a warm fuzzy feeling would always come over me.

I miss those times. I miss the artists. I miss my colleagues. And I miss the music. It was a magical collection of passionate people that made up the Positive Tone sound and spirit. We were crazy, we had a cando attitude and we thought that nothing could come in our way. We were out to take on the world and I loved every single minute of it.

Every single minute. Media, a non-profit media center that documents and produces materials for the current Malaysian DIY hardcore punk scene. Musically he fronts local punk band Pusher and sings for Carburetor Dung. Thanks to those tech geniuses who made the Internet so dependable and indispensable like the underwear gripping your crotch as you read this.

There are gazillions of definitions and yet none of it could give capture the meaning of its existence. Have I tried Wikipedia? Hell yeah. The conflict revolving this formless idea however portrays the beauty of what it really is.

Punk allows individuals to define what it is to them themselves. And in an almost natural progression these individuals who are attached to it develop chemistry among themselves to bond together without any need to announce it or by obtaining any form of recognition by some so-called punk forefathers and -mothers.

Consequently it drives individuals to a rebellious edge along with self-empowerment while gaining internal confidence to just be themselves without any obliging or conforming to any societal norms and taboos that has been put in place without their say. Any passionate form of act, be it in music, poetry, politics or even sports that that challenges tradition, fundamentalism and the rigid old ways in daily life with a fresh take and progression on things is considered punk rock to me.

It blew the minds of every single bored teenager with its shocking flamboyance, style and stripped-down musical composition. The conservative society then was not ready to accept different types of music than those usually aired on radio and TV.

Punk is was? Years went by with the yadda-yaddas and the changes that came along with it was drastic judging from the length of time. Like all the youth culture in the margins, it became a hip teenage sensation that subsequently allured hungry corporate sharks Alak Idle 40 who were eager to co-opt by buying the culture out, to turn the rebellion into money.

Lines were drawn and the scene was divided into different pockets of sub-scenes mainly according to the differences of genres and stances in each clusters. The period from recent five years till today has witnessed a part of the scene that has matured after surviving all the hanky-panky politics. The good part is, it still breathes DIY. Much progression has been made and kids are firmer in defining what they stand for.

There is not much need to depend on hotels, clubs or government-owned halls to host gigs anymore, as there are a handful of spaces being run by the kids themselves currently. These spaces are not limited to only in cities like Kuala Lumpur, but are also popping up in various small towns around Malaysia. And for a person like me who still attains a hard-on by getting and owning releases in its physical format from a favorite band with the cover and inlay- printed, hand-drawn or silkscreened , the relevance of DIY record labels like those I have mentioned are unquestionable.

Playing an important role in providing a sense of place and as the only fixed spot for local record hunters to fulfill their music ravenousness is the Ricecooker Shop. Even foreign visitors who stopped by sometimes Alak Idle 41 go crazy buying stuffs here, as rarity is almost the second nature of DIY releases.

It is in the center of Kuala Lumpur, though it is a little bit tricky to find, tucked in the basement of a building that has seen its better days. The money that we own was barely sufficient to carry us through the next day; it seems almost impossible for us to get our materials recorded and released.

We observe and we learn those who have gone the road before us and we were adamant to start our own collective record label, Knot Records, which consists of a few bands and close friends. No excuses, even if it means that we ate less that day. We had to wait until the fund was enough to get a few bands to record. It was a good start, as things went smoothly and steady with that one which made it clear to us that producing things DIY was in fact, possible.

The years of struggling did jumbled up the collective a bit. Loads of lessons were learnt in terms of organizing, financial managing and also music producing. We were firm with the stance of to be a label that does not control the direction and creative output of any bands but to be in service to bands according to their needs.

As a record label with financial investment at stake, we do monitor the production process in assurance to improve what we produce. To us the importance of quality exceeds those of quantity by any means — it is useless to have a huge listing of release with crappy quality.

It did quite some time to wake up from our hibernation but it all paid off after we came out with a couple of pro CD releases. Getting The Pips to release was an intention to diversify the scene with a softer sounding approach in getting the satirical political message across. In some ways it was also to highlight the female empowerment agenda in a male dominated scene. The most recent release by Knot is with a talented band of stray cats called The Garrison. Their album entitled Subversion was entirely a collective effort and being able to release a band with such potential gave us the push to invest extra effort in the whole production process.

The process took a considerable duration of time as it was complicated to get that exact raw vintage sound in this digitalised era. Next on the menu would be a compilation documenting the DIY scene in , called Berikan Cinta Pada Sesama featuring 16 local bands including young-at-heart veterans, Carburetor Dung and The Bolllocks , which is co-produced with Ricecooker Recordings.

We are also working on one experimental split release on vinyl which we decide to keep mum about that for now. It is no surprise that fanzines have played a crucial role in the development of the punk scene that claims to be something more than just music. The humble homemade publication originally produced to fill in the gap in media coverage has formed a corpus of literature documenting the DIY punk scene in all of its elements and expression that challenges the mainstream media as the sole reportage reporting bodies.

There were too much complaints, issues, opinions and ideas that never had the chance to be voiced out, as least on our own personal side. It was only natural or unnatural, depending how you see punk that we work on a zine of our own. The first issue started as a trial fanzine with the typical contents of articles, reviews music, print and film and also band interviews.

After selling off the first copies within the first two weeks, we knew that there were readers who might be interested to get more of the same thing. The second issue follows with minor improvements from lessons learnt from the first, with additions of contributors and, some might argue, better layout.

By the third issue, we were ready to take on the form of a magazine. The third issue costs a lot more than the first two, as we migrated to offset printing, a practical move considering our widening readership and that sweet, sweet smell of fresh offset-printed pages.

Everybody does their part; from giving ideas, writing, reporting, reviewing, illustrating, marketing, accounting, printing and also distributing. By the 4th issue, we are lucky to have few distributors helping us to spread our magazine not only in Southeast Asia, but also in Australia, Canada, France and Spain to individuals who are interested to know about the punk scene in this part of the world.

There are glimpse of that happening, as the everywhere we see seems to be clouded with new trends that are more of a lavish hobby with lack of substance. Even simple issues on humanity such as racism are being sidestepped; as for some people, the sense of belonging in a cool group matters more than anything.

Some imitate and follow what other people are doing which we all could see from the bunch of bands coming up as carbon copies of what Alak Idle 44 others were doing before, without much improvement from the original. Quantity is killing quality by the bits and all there is in the end is the uniformity that already exists outside the so-called underground scene. But then again, where is the underground today?

Let there be conflict. Let there be arguments. In a way it brings up discussions, which is the essential to what makes a scene alive. Stagnancy in the scene can only be prevented by constantly challenging oneself to tread the road that few have taken before. The scene will carry on, as long there are still people who have the balls to question and challenge the norm that is killing it.

Or else we can experience what some punks have always envisioned as their utopia: the total annihilation of the world that will bring forth a new one. If they survive this one that is. The owner is the individual who composes the music, arranges the song and pens the lyrics.

This can be done by just one person or a group of individuals doing different things. With some bands, the singer is a lyricist and the guitarist, the composer. Some bands share the spoils evenly, naming all band members as lyricist and composer. There are two halves to the publishing rights of a song. This share will stay with the songwriters for life. If the songwriter passes away then it will be shared with the beneficiaries. The other half is the Publishers share.

The publishers share initially stays with the songwriters. When the writer signs a publishing or co-publishing deal with a music publisher, only then the Publishers share is given out to these parties according to the publishing agreement. As it is, the songwriters sign these deals in exchange for a cash Amir Shazlan 47 advance. The music publishers will then act as promoters and promote the song.

What is meant by due compensation? It means to earn royalties from the use of published songs. The most common way to earn royalties is by radio airplay. Every time a song is played on the radio, there is a royalty payment. The more airplay a song gets, the more royalty a writer receives. Simple as that. Another way to earn money is to perform live music in public. By right the organisers for any event that chooses to feature a live music performance must pay royalty for every song performed in the event.

Now if you are famous enough, your song might be tuned into a karaoke tune or your song might be played in stores or supermarkets. Both of these situations require the facility owner to pay royalties too. There is also something called mechanical royalty. This comes from the physical copy of a CD. For each copy of the CD, the record label has to pay royalty to the music publishers.

There are many more ways a royalty is due for songs, but these are common ones that up and coming songwriters should be aware of. Who collects the royalties? All these royalties are collected by collective management organizations CMO.

These are not-for-profit organizations that collect royalties on behalf of its members. Different organizations have different types of members. By officially publishing your songs, it paves the way for you to become the members of these CMOs. Then you can start receiving royalties. But that does not answer the big question — what is the motivation to publish your songs? If you want to publish because you want to protect your songs, then you are doing it for the wrong reason.

This is because every song Amir Shazlan 48 you write is actually already given protection according to the Copyright Act As long as writers for the song are identified, then the copyright exists for the song. How does it apply to you?

As such, I would not advise you to go through the hassle of publishing your songs. You would profit more on your own rather than go through this entire publishing setup to claim what would possibly be small returns. Now, if you are a radio-friendly pop band and your songs are played on the airwaves quite frequently, then you have a good reason to pursue publishing. After that you can collect what royalties are due to you.

Right now there are a substantial number of bands and solo acts whose songs are being heavily played on radio, but they fail to collect royalties. Lack of awareness about how publishing works is a clear factor. There are many more similar cases out there with lesser known bands. Lastly, I hope this short piece of writing inspires you to equip yourself with the necessary knowledge and take action to claim what is rightfully yours. He also plays with Go Gerila.

So here goes. When Aizat was eliminated from Akademi Fantasia AF , the biggest challenge we faced was, how do we move forward from here? Aizat, he was a natural stage performer. He showed confidence like he is one of the top singers around during his AF days. However, he was not your stereotypical presentable singer type.

He was overweight and the public was so negative of him. I still remember the times when my mother would cry over the remarks made about him by the public. Aizat however, was forever forgiving — something about him that I truly admire. Then after 18 years of being obese, he slimmed down.

All he did was hit the gym and jog. Anas Amdan 51 For him, it was something that never happened. They were indirectly forgiven by him. Let people judge me based on my work, not the way I look, or where I come from. The whole experience changed me a lot. It made me look at artist from a very different angle since. If you put a lot of focus in what you intent to do, InsyaAllah, God will help you achieve that. The basis of KGE is simple — we admire pure passionate talents and help them achieve their ambitions.

We are small but full of passion. To be honest, it was the first time we got the chance to compose our own stuff. I had some materials that I composed while I was in Brisbane finishing my degree, but this, was totally something else. One is light and the other one is heavier. I really admire those who excel writing songs in Malay.

For me they are pure geniuses. As for the music on the album, I like to look at things the simplest way as possible. Writing music to me is like cooking. A good chef will always be reputable for his good food and with the right amount of ingredients, your own creativity; you can produce a great meal.

For us, we wanted to use our own creativity and cater for anyone who wants it. We just want to develop our own unique music that hopefully connects. If not, I will try a different recipe. Most of them will say things that you want to hear, seriously. Neutral perspective is always better. Always respect your listeners. Never undermine them, only a loser does that. Set your ego aside and accept to learn the truth. You just need to learn from it because music is how your heart communicates to another heart.

That is the beauty of music. Back to Percubaan Pertama, a few years back, Roslan Aziz told Aizat the Anas Amdan 53 secret on how his Ikhlas concert in was a massive success — he went out there and performed as many areas as possible prior to it. It was a rather difficult thing to do though, especially when we live in a different era where people are so used to free concerts, but hey, someone needs to step up, right?

Preparing for it was a hell but it all went well. We successfully went out there. We had two intentions for the tour; to send a clear message to the industry — to encourage more paying concert for artist; and to the performers — reach out to your fans!

Make a real concert experience for them! Financially, we made a lost for the Borneo tour. We did not have sufficient sponsor to cover the cost so we forked out our own money to ensure that it happens. We are after all in a risky business anyway, so risk is just an option that sometimes you just have to take. But Alhamdulillah, a few months later DiGi took notice of our Borneo Tour and backed him up for few more dates in the peninsular.

I am so happy that Aizat got the chance to perform at so many different areas. It was even sweeter because all were ticketed concerts. Why is paying concert important to us? Because free concerts will not help you. Because majority who turned up for it are not really your fans! They are a mixture of people who just so happen to walk by the stage from some booth, sit down and not singing to your song.

Speaking of creative values, in the West, people in the creative business are valued highly because they colour their whole country with their creativity. I always felt like the only way we can beat the Western is through our creativity. Forget the physical facets. Why do you think some of the international artistes can be heard here in our country? The problem here in Malaysia is that we never take creative values seriously. By serious, I mean we never handle things professionally.

For example, I find it quite frustrating when some of us can happily work without having any black and white signed. The music industry needs to start small somewhere. Anyway, I am not going to talk so much about the music industry apart of it being just a game. The saying is not about what you know, is about who you know pretty much sums it up. Well at 24, I still have a lot of time to not care so much about the politics behind it.

I rather not let my creative juice be affected by things that they want you to do. I am just an outsider. Looking back, I would say that I am quite fortunate than to have the financial support from my family when all these started. Not many people have that. I do get a lot of people saying that our success was because of my background. Well let me tell you this, money is not at all correlated with the music you make. I did not make an offer to the almighty to bless me with this gift.

I heard stories that some people spend hundreds of thousands for an album that guarantee a hit but still end up nowhere. Anas Amdan 55 For me once again, it all comes down to your intention in the first place. Well I hope this journal will help others out there who inspire to be a singer, artist, or musicians. It is just my side of the story and this is what I can honestly tell you. Always believe and make it happen, or else you will end up being a typical person who live in the past, brag about past glory and at the same time complain about past failures.

I am still young in this industry. My serious involvement in the music industry has only been 3 years. Still is a baby. I have a lot to learn. But I always believe in my potential. So must you. This is as much as I can offer my experience and journey. Always look at the positive side of things and try to have patience in yourself. Be the future. On top of it all, have pure intentions! He also happens to be a lecturer. Unfortunately, sometimes the commercial and industrial aspects of the music business can disillusion some and make some quit playing music altogether and leave some unable to see the forest from the trees.

My troubadour friend and folk hero Meor Yusof Aziddin once told me that songs are like prayers. But to whom? I asked myself. Well, to whomever you believe in and wish to deliver them to, be it the Almighty, spirits, Mother Nature, or lover I suppose. We, as human beings, are mere mediators.

We are the medium for songs. All physical beings are. Look at Azmyl Yunor 58 how many songs by dead people we are still singing along to now. I bet my bottom ringgit that you are listening to one right now. I think this perspective becomes more evident if you go it solo and spend a lot time alone somewhere godforsaken, disconnected from everyone— handphones are evil! As physical beings, we react to our surroundings: the weather, the room temperature, the people you are in company with, the noises you hear, how rude the waiter was when you ordered your teh ais over lunch today.

A mere chemical reaction from physical stimuli. Or maybe not. The late singer-songwriter and all round rabak artist Townes Van Zandt once remarked that in order to write a song, you need to be alone. He also noted that being alone is not being lonely.

Being alone is a state of mind. It allows you to focus on the experience, the journey, not the end result or destination. Being lonely helps too since you feel desperate and have the urge to express yourself. However, a lot of people are afraid of being alone. Sad but true. Being alone should be celebrated, and what best way to celebrate it than writing a song.

You willingly open your heart and bare you soul and share and face your innermost hopes and fears, stare it in the eye, and conquer or come to terms with it. The duty of the artist in this sense is to realise its arrival and access its worth: should you spend some time looking at the postcard in detail and write back? Or leave the postcard lying forgotten in the mailbox of your mind? Sometimes, you write a postcard back and send Azmyl Yunor 59 it off to someone else.

In this sense, songs are good company, like an old friend. Songs sometimes remind you of something, somewhere. Sometimes the song reminds you of what a terrible person you were and you reflect on how far you have changed or remain the same. This however, brings us to the question of documenting or capturing the song on record. Songs that are recorded are merely a documentation of the version of the song on the specific day and time and place it was recorded.

It is not necessarily THE definitive version. Songs were never sold in the past; the music industry is only about a hundred or so years old. Even the great P. My art is for society. I like to keep that part of my songwriting innocent, naive, spontaneous, and not probe it too much.

Songs have lives of their own. The size apart, it has had a good run in the music business. Music teachers are more in demand than ever. Small gigs and bigger events are local-act-friendly than it ever was. The local-local, as in the ethnic side of the music scene, the Kadazan, the Dusun, the Kadazan-Dusun, the Murut, the Bajau and so on are doing awesome especially when the grassroots are still buying the CDs!

Bear in mind that these were achieved with no online sales or promo, no newspaper advertising, no interviews on TV. Just happy go lucky reggae influenced local pop songs as it was done in the 80s. Sure-sure long term, protection and all that, but with only 1 station playing your song? Get what I mean? Business sense, the small labels that are in KK manages the artist like a big label would, with the artist getting close to nothing in terms of monetary wise but all the fame to feed an 11 member football squad.

To me, we fail to think long term. You have four weeks to finish your songwriting and then two weeks to put it on tape. While the producers master the tracks, you have to shoot the Karaoke videos within two days. This has been the same process since KDM first started.

The technology has evolved yet the sound chose to stay behind. No offence to KDM because the main core buyers who still frequent the record shops, the tamu and those religiously source these releases came from that same era.

The same people who were buying then are buying now. So how can the new generation bridge the gap? We say we want change, change comes, and we let it slide. How so? We only talk, the previous generation of music lovers still loves the music scene, they are still going out to buy it and not just talk about it. We all want to complain about the price of CDs. We want it to grow.

We want it to grow for free. We need to re-learn to respect ourselves before we go out and showcase ourselves. Now, what about the rest of the music here in KK? The indie scene here is alive! Where the instruments, the amps, the drum skins, the brand does not matter. What matters is that music is here, its now, its loud and its alive. Songs are still at four minutes minimum, the guitar solos are still 16 bars, a song has at least two sections to show off musical technicality.

Music is music and not about dollars and cents. Where artistic creativity outshines commercial viability. In other words, the underground movement is as strong as ever. Until recently, say the past two to three years, the indie movement here was never taken seriously.

It was always perceived as a hobby, as a waste of time for kids who have nothing better to do. Then, something happened. A local DJ broadcasting from KL started to play anything and almost everything that came out of Sabah, be it home made demos, polished singles or rough takes on radio. From onwards, music has taken flight and never looked back! Then the wonder of evolution took place. The value of quality over quantity came into play.

Everyone was willing to share knowledge. A lot of the bands have yet to explore beyond their comfort zone. Okay, allow me to take a few steps back and give you a picture on what Chris Pereira 64 do most of the bands here understand about having their song played on radio. In a harsher way to put it — that they have to be owned by someone else. This year itself, around middle of the year, I had a session with a metal band and we were discussing about the metal scene and how some bands sound the way they are.

The scene here is still fresh, so fresh that they hope a label will pick them up and polish them and not the other way round — polished and ready to take on the world. At the same time, in this freshness is where I find the discovery, the adventure, the wonders of finding out what sound works for you. Where trends are not followed and roots are dug up and digested. How do we sound like Led Zeppelin? What made the Beatles vibe on their recording so awesome? The game now is waiting for it to mature and be an industry instead of just a scene.

On regular basis, you will find yourself battling elbows with unforgiving media photographers for a few inches of extra space. And all these are for? The heavy pressure of capturing fleeting moments of a band, the fans and the event. To me, photography is not just about shooting it well, but also shooting it the right way. It has a lot to do with participation, preparation, and anticipation. You participate by buying the music and reading through the lyrics to understand the artist better.

You prepare by remembering the verses and choruses of their songs, as well as the stage lightings setup so that you can capture aesthetically good, memorable moments. Most importantly, you need to have the foresight on where the next photographic moment will take place.

Everything is in the details as a good photograph is already half made even before the shutter clicks. How do you shoot a group portrait of musicians or a singer-songwriter in her favourite private space? What about that light-hearted and candid moments between the artiste, composer and producer during recording sessions at a studio or random going-ons backstage after a concert or the roadtrip in a beat up van for a show up North in godknowswhere?

To find a story to tell in places that are often overlooked is by far one of the most difficult yet crucial tasks of a good photographer. As demanding, unprofitable and exhausting as it may be, there is in fact much more to gain from this less travelled road. You play the part of a passionate fanboy, immortalise moments in pictures forever, befriend and hang out with truly inspiring people, and sometimes get paid at the end of it.

A pretty sweet deal, I must say. Although my venture into music photography was rather brief, it was a whirlwind of back-breaking, hair-raising, ear-splitting, solid three years of great times. I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to document almost the entire spectrum of the local music industry; from bands to DJs to singersongwriters, small gigs to massive music festivals, modest indie set-ups to major mainstream award shows, local and international acts with Paramore being the last overseas artiste photographed in late while spanning a variety of genres, and the many faces of unsung heroes — the organisers, the managers, the crew, and of course, the fans.

Not forgetting club gigs with visiting DJs from around the region a memorable one being DJ Rocky Rock, the official DJ for Black Eyed Peas spinning booty-shaking-friendly tunes and accompanied by dancers invited from the far Orient who resembles the Wondergirls on crack, with Danial Radzmi 68 far, far less clothing, dancing in cages and spinning around stripper poles.

There was also a sado-masochism theme night, master-slave, leather and whips and all that jazz, which, by the way, happened to be my first day on the job as a full-time photographer. Rewinding back, my first most vivid memory of music-photographercoming-of-age, for lack of a cornier phrase, was back in mid at Laundry Bar while freelancing with Chaswood which included other performance spaces like The Apartment and Republic Bar.

Performing that night was Bunkface, Oh Chentaku and none other than living legends, Butterfingers, and what a glorious night it was. And then there was the mighty Butterfingers to close the night. It was my first close encounter with a band I worshiped short of building a shrine to give daily thanks to Dear Leader and one that I quite literally grew up with since I was this snotty, pimpled-face 13 year old.

It happens all the time. Not so much because I finally get to meet a long time idol, but how human he seems. Humble, gracious and genuinely passionate about what they do. It has been a constant source of inspiration, the never-say-die attitude, hard work, sacrifice and dedication the artistes, managers, crew, and the rest put into their craft. Regardless of who or what they are, pretty much everyone is comrade-in-arms and rebels of the same cause. Something that — sad to say — is often lost in the materialist rat race of the wider capitalist community.

It is this spirit that must always be remembered; of people coming together for a single cause, of collective celebration of joy, and our innate capacity to create artistic expressions of beauty, meaning and purpose. As Robert E.

The truth is this: the march of Providence is so slow, our desires so impatient, the work of progress is so immense, and our means of aiding it so feeble, the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope. Like a foot soldier in a trench between two wars of the utmost beautiful kind, two episodes of a heartwarming story, two lovers stuck in that Twilight Zone limbo of post-quarrel and pre-make up sex.

I was a witness to these moments, and more. I was both creator and participator, detached yet connected at the same time. I was a part of it but standing apart, invisible yet known. An enlightening dissonance, a unique dichotomy, one might say. Though it should be known that the photographer and the camera are only mediums by which these moments are immortalized and passed on for all the rest to bear witness. Although photography generates works that can be called art — it requires subjectivity, it can lie, it gives aesthetic pleasure — photography is not, to begin with, an art form at all.

Like language, it is a medium in which works of art among other things are made. Danial Radzmi 71 In a rather poetic way to put it, photographs do not create art but instead pays homage to works of art. Nevertheless, the visual portrayal of music is merely part of a larger chronicle, both of which — sounds and sight — tell stories, though in different ways.

Art and thought. Who are we? What does a Malaysian song sound like? How does it move and in what way? What does it look like? There need not be an absolute, final answer. What matters more is the journey towards unity and piecing together this fragmented creative landscape we have today. And there are some stories that we must never forget.

So, what stories have I crafted these past brief years? Let me rephrase that —what stories have I found and captured? What do my images, and those of others, talk about? What do they speak of? Why, immortality, of course. In the same way why stars are beautiful, looking at a still photo is looking at the past.

Photography captures the death of a moment and gives a sobering reminder that the end is nigh. Everything becomes that much more meaningful because it is doomed. Thanks to the advances of science and technology, it has become easier today to preserve such precious memories and stories, and the first time in the history of humanity that we are accorded with such a gift. Danial Radzmi 72 Oftentimes, expressions of an art form — be it a song, an album cover, a music video, a picture of a band mid-show on stage — need not be neither complex nor deep.

Sometimes, it is simply memorable. This chapter marks the death of my brief career as a music photographer, but the images captured will live on. Before, I wrote with light. Today, I write these words. He has also performed with the likes of Zee Avi, Rendra Zawawi, and many more. In my current position, I am neither a success story, nor am I failure. Even though I have been in the music industry for 6 years, I do not believe I have the right to preach of it as if I know it so well.

The fact is that, the music industry is ever changing and the only thing I can do is to tell you of what I know best - my own story. Hello, my name is David Rafael Buri. I have always loved music. Ever since I was a young boy, music was always a big part of my life. My mother would put on some Latin tunes and we would just groove and dance to the sound of the beat.

Our family never really lived a moment without music. This became an inspiration to why I wanted to pick up an instrument. I wanted to play guitar. I wanted to make music. I constantly had these melodies in my head that needed to be translated into reality. But sadly, I never did pick up an instrument during my young age.

Growing up in the small urban town of Miri, Sarawak, I thought musicianship was David Buri 75 only for those who had special talent. Though I did admire anyone who could play even a single chord, I did not think I would ever be good enough to learn how to play myself. This is a town that sold chicken rice for RM2. Seeing a Fender guitar for RM1, seemed like a lot of money in comparison to everything else around. To me, anyone who owned a guitar, let alone an electric guitar, was rich and very talented.

Schools at that time did not really support the creative medium either. The music and arts classes were always substituted for mathematics or something else. Even if we did have music class, the only instrument we were actually learning was the Recorder, or better yet, the Triangle. With all these reasons in mind, music became nothing more than something I would listen to. At the age of 14, though, everything changed. My family moved.

My father was able to get a job in the Netherlands. I started attending an American international high school. As much as everyone hates the United States, I will be forever grateful for this shift in my life that actually propelled me to what I would be doing later on. The American system, unlike the British, was very creative based. They taught about balance and of how students should excel academically as well as creatively. With this in mind, my paradigm completely shifted and I began to learn things I thought I never would.

I was in love. This was a whole new world for me. This was a culture I thought only existed on TV shows. I started hanging around the creative kids. They basically gave a crash course on Rock music and I took it all in. These kids were talented. I would watch as a 14 year old would flawlessly perform an Yngwie Malmsteen song.

I spent the afternoons watching high school bands perform rock songs perfectly. I met opera singers, soul singers, jazz guitarists - everyone. David Buri 76 I was inspired to say the least. I wanted to play music. I wanted to be a part of this musical movement and play with the rest.

I found my passion and with the help, motivation and encouragement of others, I was determined to be a musician. And so, I picked up my first acoustic guitar when I was 15 years old. Every day I would come home and practice for six hours straight. It actually came to a point where I started to bring my guitar to school and play during recess — just so I could have an extra 20 minutes a day to practice.

I was determined and well-disciplined. I even had this little rat race going on in my head. I needed to be as good as or even better than everyone in my school. I wanted to be the best guitarist around. This thought by itself motivated me even more. By the time I was 16, I bought my first electric guitar. We were out to take on the world and I loved every single minute of it. Every single minute. Media, a non-profit media center that documents and produces materials for the current Malaysian DIY hardcore punk scene.

Musically he fronts local punk band Pusher and sings for Carburetor Dung. Thanks to those tech geniuses who made the Internet so dependable and indispensable like the underwear gripping your crotch as you read this. There are gazillions of definitions and yet none of it could give capture the meaning of its existence.

Have I tried Wikipedia? Hell yeah. The conflict revolving this formless idea however portrays the beauty of what it really is. Punk allows individuals to define what it is to them themselves. And in an almost natural progression these individuals who are attached to it develop chemistry among themselves to bond together without any need to announce it or by obtaining any form of recognition by some so-called punk forefathers and -mothers.

Consequently it drives individuals to a rebellious edge along with self-empowerment while gaining internal confidence to just be themselves without any obliging or conforming to any societal norms and taboos that has been put in place without their say. Any passionate form of act, be it in music, poetry, politics or even sports that that challenges tradition, fundamentalism and the rigid old ways in daily life with a fresh take and progression on things is considered punk rock to me.

It blew the minds of every single bored teenager with its shocking flamboyance, style and stripped-down musical composition. The conservative society then was not ready to accept different types of music than those usually aired on radio and TV. Punk is was? Years went by with the yadda-yaddas and the changes that came along with it was drastic judging from the length of time. Like all the youth culture in the margins, it became a hip teenage sensation that subsequently allured hungry corporate sharks Alak Idle 40 who were eager to co-opt by buying the culture out, to turn the rebellion into money.

Lines were drawn and the scene was divided into different pockets of sub-scenes mainly according to the differences of genres and stances in each clusters. The period from recent five years till today has witnessed a part of the scene that has matured after surviving all the hanky-panky politics.

The good part is, it still breathes DIY. Much progression has been made and kids are firmer in defining what they stand for. There is not much need to depend on hotels, clubs or government-owned halls to host gigs anymore, as there are a handful of spaces being run by the kids themselves currently.

These spaces are not limited to only in cities like Kuala Lumpur, but are also popping up in various small towns around Malaysia. And for a person like me who still attains a hard-on by getting and owning releases in its physical format from a favorite band with the cover and inlay- printed, hand-drawn or silkscreened , the relevance of DIY record labels like those I have mentioned are unquestionable.

Playing an important role in providing a sense of place and as the only fixed spot for local record hunters to fulfill their music ravenousness is the Ricecooker Shop. Even foreign visitors who stopped by sometimes Alak Idle 41 go crazy buying stuffs here, as rarity is almost the second nature of DIY releases. It is in the center of Kuala Lumpur, though it is a little bit tricky to find, tucked in the basement of a building that has seen its better days. The money that we own was barely sufficient to carry us through the next day; it seems almost impossible for us to get our materials recorded and released.

We observe and we learn those who have gone the road before us and we were adamant to start our own collective record label, Knot Records, which consists of a few bands and close friends. No excuses, even if it means that we ate less that day. We had to wait until the fund was enough to get a few bands to record. It was a good start, as things went smoothly and steady with that one which made it clear to us that producing things DIY was in fact, possible. The years of struggling did jumbled up the collective a bit.

Loads of lessons were learnt in terms of organizing, financial managing and also music producing. We were firm with the stance of to be a label that does not control the direction and creative output of any bands but to be in service to bands according to their needs. As a record label with financial investment at stake, we do monitor the production process in assurance to improve what we produce.

To us the importance of quality exceeds those of quantity by any means — it is useless to have a huge listing of release with crappy quality. It did quite some time to wake up from our hibernation but it all paid off after we came out with a couple of pro CD releases. Getting The Pips to release was an intention to diversify the scene with a softer sounding approach in getting the satirical political message across. In some ways it was also to highlight the female empowerment agenda in a male dominated scene.

The most recent release by Knot is with a talented band of stray cats called The Garrison. Their album entitled Subversion was entirely a collective effort and being able to release a band with such potential gave us the push to invest extra effort in the whole production process.

The process took a considerable duration of time as it was complicated to get that exact raw vintage sound in this digitalised era. Next on the menu would be a compilation documenting the DIY scene in , called Berikan Cinta Pada Sesama featuring 16 local bands including young-at-heart veterans, Carburetor Dung and The Bolllocks , which is co-produced with Ricecooker Recordings. We are also working on one experimental split release on vinyl which we decide to keep mum about that for now.

It is no surprise that fanzines have played a crucial role in the development of the punk scene that claims to be something more than just music. The humble homemade publication originally produced to fill in the gap in media coverage has formed a corpus of literature documenting the DIY punk scene in all of its elements and expression that challenges the mainstream media as the sole reportage reporting bodies.

There were too much complaints, issues, opinions and ideas that never had the chance to be voiced out, as least on our own personal side. It was only natural or unnatural, depending how you see punk that we work on a zine of our own. The first issue started as a trial fanzine with the typical contents of articles, reviews music, print and film and also band interviews. After selling off the first copies within the first two weeks, we knew that there were readers who might be interested to get more of the same thing.

The second issue follows with minor improvements from lessons learnt from the first, with additions of contributors and, some might argue, better layout. By the third issue, we were ready to take on the form of a magazine. The third issue costs a lot more than the first two, as we migrated to offset printing, a practical move considering our widening readership and that sweet, sweet smell of fresh offset-printed pages.

Everybody does their part; from giving ideas, writing, reporting, reviewing, illustrating, marketing, accounting, printing and also distributing. By the 4th issue, we are lucky to have few distributors helping us to spread our magazine not only in Southeast Asia, but also in Australia, Canada, France and Spain to individuals who are interested to know about the punk scene in this part of the world. There are glimpse of that happening, as the everywhere we see seems to be clouded with new trends that are more of a lavish hobby with lack of substance.

Even simple issues on humanity such as racism are being sidestepped; as for some people, the sense of belonging in a cool group matters more than anything. Some imitate and follow what other people are doing which we all could see from the bunch of bands coming up as carbon copies of what Alak Idle 44 others were doing before, without much improvement from the original.

Quantity is killing quality by the bits and all there is in the end is the uniformity that already exists outside the so-called underground scene. But then again, where is the underground today? Let there be conflict. Let there be arguments. In a way it brings up discussions, which is the essential to what makes a scene alive. Stagnancy in the scene can only be prevented by constantly challenging oneself to tread the road that few have taken before.

The scene will carry on, as long there are still people who have the balls to question and challenge the norm that is killing it. Or else we can experience what some punks have always envisioned as their utopia: the total annihilation of the world that will bring forth a new one. If they survive this one that is. The owner is the individual who composes the music, arranges the song and pens the lyrics.

This can be done by just one person or a group of individuals doing different things. With some bands, the singer is a lyricist and the guitarist, the composer. Some bands share the spoils evenly, naming all band members as lyricist and composer. There are two halves to the publishing rights of a song. This share will stay with the songwriters for life. If the songwriter passes away then it will be shared with the beneficiaries.

The other half is the Publishers share. The publishers share initially stays with the songwriters. When the writer signs a publishing or co-publishing deal with a music publisher, only then the Publishers share is given out to these parties according to the publishing agreement. As it is, the songwriters sign these deals in exchange for a cash Amir Shazlan 47 advance. The music publishers will then act as promoters and promote the song.

What is meant by due compensation? It means to earn royalties from the use of published songs. The most common way to earn royalties is by radio airplay. Every time a song is played on the radio, there is a royalty payment. The more airplay a song gets, the more royalty a writer receives. Simple as that. Another way to earn money is to perform live music in public. By right the organisers for any event that chooses to feature a live music performance must pay royalty for every song performed in the event.

Now if you are famous enough, your song might be tuned into a karaoke tune or your song might be played in stores or supermarkets. Both of these situations require the facility owner to pay royalties too. There is also something called mechanical royalty. This comes from the physical copy of a CD. For each copy of the CD, the record label has to pay royalty to the music publishers. There are many more ways a royalty is due for songs, but these are common ones that up and coming songwriters should be aware of.

Who collects the royalties? All these royalties are collected by collective management organizations CMO. These are not-for-profit organizations that collect royalties on behalf of its members. Different organizations have different types of members. By officially publishing your songs, it paves the way for you to become the members of these CMOs. Then you can start receiving royalties.

But that does not answer the big question — what is the motivation to publish your songs? If you want to publish because you want to protect your songs, then you are doing it for the wrong reason. This is because every song Amir Shazlan 48 you write is actually already given protection according to the Copyright Act As long as writers for the song are identified, then the copyright exists for the song. How does it apply to you?

As such, I would not advise you to go through the hassle of publishing your songs. You would profit more on your own rather than go through this entire publishing setup to claim what would possibly be small returns. Now, if you are a radio-friendly pop band and your songs are played on the airwaves quite frequently, then you have a good reason to pursue publishing.

After that you can collect what royalties are due to you. Right now there are a substantial number of bands and solo acts whose songs are being heavily played on radio, but they fail to collect royalties. Lack of awareness about how publishing works is a clear factor. There are many more similar cases out there with lesser known bands. Lastly, I hope this short piece of writing inspires you to equip yourself with the necessary knowledge and take action to claim what is rightfully yours.

He also plays with Go Gerila. So here goes. When Aizat was eliminated from Akademi Fantasia AF , the biggest challenge we faced was, how do we move forward from here? Aizat, he was a natural stage performer. He showed confidence like he is one of the top singers around during his AF days.

However, he was not your stereotypical presentable singer type. He was overweight and the public was so negative of him. I still remember the times when my mother would cry over the remarks made about him by the public. Aizat however, was forever forgiving — something about him that I truly admire. Then after 18 years of being obese, he slimmed down. All he did was hit the gym and jog. Anas Amdan 51 For him, it was something that never happened. They were indirectly forgiven by him.

Let people judge me based on my work, not the way I look, or where I come from. The whole experience changed me a lot. It made me look at artist from a very different angle since. If you put a lot of focus in what you intent to do, InsyaAllah, God will help you achieve that. The basis of KGE is simple — we admire pure passionate talents and help them achieve their ambitions. We are small but full of passion. To be honest, it was the first time we got the chance to compose our own stuff.

I had some materials that I composed while I was in Brisbane finishing my degree, but this, was totally something else. One is light and the other one is heavier. I really admire those who excel writing songs in Malay. For me they are pure geniuses. As for the music on the album, I like to look at things the simplest way as possible. Writing music to me is like cooking.

A good chef will always be reputable for his good food and with the right amount of ingredients, your own creativity; you can produce a great meal. For us, we wanted to use our own creativity and cater for anyone who wants it. We just want to develop our own unique music that hopefully connects.

If not, I will try a different recipe. Most of them will say things that you want to hear, seriously. Neutral perspective is always better. Always respect your listeners. Never undermine them, only a loser does that. Set your ego aside and accept to learn the truth. You just need to learn from it because music is how your heart communicates to another heart. That is the beauty of music. Back to Percubaan Pertama, a few years back, Roslan Aziz told Aizat the Anas Amdan 53 secret on how his Ikhlas concert in was a massive success — he went out there and performed as many areas as possible prior to it.

It was a rather difficult thing to do though, especially when we live in a different era where people are so used to free concerts, but hey, someone needs to step up, right? Preparing for it was a hell but it all went well. We successfully went out there. We had two intentions for the tour; to send a clear message to the industry — to encourage more paying concert for artist; and to the performers — reach out to your fans!

Make a real concert experience for them! Financially, we made a lost for the Borneo tour. We did not have sufficient sponsor to cover the cost so we forked out our own money to ensure that it happens. We are after all in a risky business anyway, so risk is just an option that sometimes you just have to take. But Alhamdulillah, a few months later DiGi took notice of our Borneo Tour and backed him up for few more dates in the peninsular. I am so happy that Aizat got the chance to perform at so many different areas.

It was even sweeter because all were ticketed concerts. Why is paying concert important to us? Because free concerts will not help you. Because majority who turned up for it are not really your fans! They are a mixture of people who just so happen to walk by the stage from some booth, sit down and not singing to your song. Speaking of creative values, in the West, people in the creative business are valued highly because they colour their whole country with their creativity.

I always felt like the only way we can beat the Western is through our creativity. Forget the physical facets. Why do you think some of the international artistes can be heard here in our country? The problem here in Malaysia is that we never take creative values seriously.

By serious, I mean we never handle things professionally. For example, I find it quite frustrating when some of us can happily work without having any black and white signed. The music industry needs to start small somewhere.

Anyway, I am not going to talk so much about the music industry apart of it being just a game. The saying is not about what you know, is about who you know pretty much sums it up. Well at 24, I still have a lot of time to not care so much about the politics behind it. I rather not let my creative juice be affected by things that they want you to do. I am just an outsider.

Looking back, I would say that I am quite fortunate than to have the financial support from my family when all these started. Not many people have that. I do get a lot of people saying that our success was because of my background. Well let me tell you this, money is not at all correlated with the music you make. I did not make an offer to the almighty to bless me with this gift. I heard stories that some people spend hundreds of thousands for an album that guarantee a hit but still end up nowhere.

Anas Amdan 55 For me once again, it all comes down to your intention in the first place. Well I hope this journal will help others out there who inspire to be a singer, artist, or musicians. It is just my side of the story and this is what I can honestly tell you. Always believe and make it happen, or else you will end up being a typical person who live in the past, brag about past glory and at the same time complain about past failures.

I am still young in this industry. My serious involvement in the music industry has only been 3 years. Still is a baby. I have a lot to learn. But I always believe in my potential. So must you. This is as much as I can offer my experience and journey. Always look at the positive side of things and try to have patience in yourself. Be the future. On top of it all, have pure intentions!

He also happens to be a lecturer. Unfortunately, sometimes the commercial and industrial aspects of the music business can disillusion some and make some quit playing music altogether and leave some unable to see the forest from the trees. My troubadour friend and folk hero Meor Yusof Aziddin once told me that songs are like prayers. But to whom? I asked myself. Well, to whomever you believe in and wish to deliver them to, be it the Almighty, spirits, Mother Nature, or lover I suppose.

We, as human beings, are mere mediators. We are the medium for songs. All physical beings are. Look at Azmyl Yunor 58 how many songs by dead people we are still singing along to now. I bet my bottom ringgit that you are listening to one right now.

I think this perspective becomes more evident if you go it solo and spend a lot time alone somewhere godforsaken, disconnected from everyone— handphones are evil! As physical beings, we react to our surroundings: the weather, the room temperature, the people you are in company with, the noises you hear, how rude the waiter was when you ordered your teh ais over lunch today. A mere chemical reaction from physical stimuli. Or maybe not. The late singer-songwriter and all round rabak artist Townes Van Zandt once remarked that in order to write a song, you need to be alone.

He also noted that being alone is not being lonely. Being alone is a state of mind. It allows you to focus on the experience, the journey, not the end result or destination. Being lonely helps too since you feel desperate and have the urge to express yourself. However, a lot of people are afraid of being alone. Sad but true. Being alone should be celebrated, and what best way to celebrate it than writing a song.

You willingly open your heart and bare you soul and share and face your innermost hopes and fears, stare it in the eye, and conquer or come to terms with it. The duty of the artist in this sense is to realise its arrival and access its worth: should you spend some time looking at the postcard in detail and write back? Or leave the postcard lying forgotten in the mailbox of your mind? Sometimes, you write a postcard back and send Azmyl Yunor 59 it off to someone else.

In this sense, songs are good company, like an old friend. Songs sometimes remind you of something, somewhere. Sometimes the song reminds you of what a terrible person you were and you reflect on how far you have changed or remain the same. This however, brings us to the question of documenting or capturing the song on record. Songs that are recorded are merely a documentation of the version of the song on the specific day and time and place it was recorded. It is not necessarily THE definitive version.

Songs were never sold in the past; the music industry is only about a hundred or so years old. Even the great P. My art is for society. I like to keep that part of my songwriting innocent, naive, spontaneous, and not probe it too much. Songs have lives of their own. The size apart, it has had a good run in the music business. Music teachers are more in demand than ever. Small gigs and bigger events are local-act-friendly than it ever was.

The local-local, as in the ethnic side of the music scene, the Kadazan, the Dusun, the Kadazan-Dusun, the Murut, the Bajau and so on are doing awesome especially when the grassroots are still buying the CDs! Bear in mind that these were achieved with no online sales or promo, no newspaper advertising, no interviews on TV. Just happy go lucky reggae influenced local pop songs as it was done in the 80s. Sure-sure long term, protection and all that, but with only 1 station playing your song?

Get what I mean? Business sense, the small labels that are in KK manages the artist like a big label would, with the artist getting close to nothing in terms of monetary wise but all the fame to feed an 11 member football squad. To me, we fail to think long term. You have four weeks to finish your songwriting and then two weeks to put it on tape. While the producers master the tracks, you have to shoot the Karaoke videos within two days.

This has been the same process since KDM first started. The technology has evolved yet the sound chose to stay behind. No offence to KDM because the main core buyers who still frequent the record shops, the tamu and those religiously source these releases came from that same era. The same people who were buying then are buying now. So how can the new generation bridge the gap? We say we want change, change comes, and we let it slide.

How so? We only talk, the previous generation of music lovers still loves the music scene, they are still going out to buy it and not just talk about it. We all want to complain about the price of CDs. We want it to grow. We want it to grow for free. We need to re-learn to respect ourselves before we go out and showcase ourselves. Now, what about the rest of the music here in KK? The indie scene here is alive! Where the instruments, the amps, the drum skins, the brand does not matter.

What matters is that music is here, its now, its loud and its alive. Songs are still at four minutes minimum, the guitar solos are still 16 bars, a song has at least two sections to show off musical technicality. Music is music and not about dollars and cents. Where artistic creativity outshines commercial viability. In other words, the underground movement is as strong as ever.

Until recently, say the past two to three years, the indie movement here was never taken seriously. It was always perceived as a hobby, as a waste of time for kids who have nothing better to do. Then, something happened. A local DJ broadcasting from KL started to play anything and almost everything that came out of Sabah, be it home made demos, polished singles or rough takes on radio.

From onwards, music has taken flight and never looked back! Then the wonder of evolution took place. The value of quality over quantity came into play. Everyone was willing to share knowledge. A lot of the bands have yet to explore beyond their comfort zone. Okay, allow me to take a few steps back and give you a picture on what Chris Pereira 64 do most of the bands here understand about having their song played on radio.

In a harsher way to put it — that they have to be owned by someone else. This year itself, around middle of the year, I had a session with a metal band and we were discussing about the metal scene and how some bands sound the way they are. The scene here is still fresh, so fresh that they hope a label will pick them up and polish them and not the other way round — polished and ready to take on the world. At the same time, in this freshness is where I find the discovery, the adventure, the wonders of finding out what sound works for you.

Where trends are not followed and roots are dug up and digested. How do we sound like Led Zeppelin? What made the Beatles vibe on their recording so awesome? The game now is waiting for it to mature and be an industry instead of just a scene.

On regular basis, you will find yourself battling elbows with unforgiving media photographers for a few inches of extra space. And all these are for? The heavy pressure of capturing fleeting moments of a band, the fans and the event. To me, photography is not just about shooting it well, but also shooting it the right way.

It has a lot to do with participation, preparation, and anticipation. You participate by buying the music and reading through the lyrics to understand the artist better. You prepare by remembering the verses and choruses of their songs, as well as the stage lightings setup so that you can capture aesthetically good, memorable moments. Most importantly, you need to have the foresight on where the next photographic moment will take place.

Everything is in the details as a good photograph is already half made even before the shutter clicks. How do you shoot a group portrait of musicians or a singer-songwriter in her favourite private space? What about that light-hearted and candid moments between the artiste, composer and producer during recording sessions at a studio or random going-ons backstage after a concert or the roadtrip in a beat up van for a show up North in godknowswhere?

To find a story to tell in places that are often overlooked is by far one of the most difficult yet crucial tasks of a good photographer. As demanding, unprofitable and exhausting as it may be, there is in fact much more to gain from this less travelled road. You play the part of a passionate fanboy, immortalise moments in pictures forever, befriend and hang out with truly inspiring people, and sometimes get paid at the end of it.

A pretty sweet deal, I must say. Although my venture into music photography was rather brief, it was a whirlwind of back-breaking, hair-raising, ear-splitting, solid three years of great times. I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to document almost the entire spectrum of the local music industry; from bands to DJs to singersongwriters, small gigs to massive music festivals, modest indie set-ups to major mainstream award shows, local and international acts with Paramore being the last overseas artiste photographed in late while spanning a variety of genres, and the many faces of unsung heroes — the organisers, the managers, the crew, and of course, the fans.

Not forgetting club gigs with visiting DJs from around the region a memorable one being DJ Rocky Rock, the official DJ for Black Eyed Peas spinning booty-shaking-friendly tunes and accompanied by dancers invited from the far Orient who resembles the Wondergirls on crack, with Danial Radzmi 68 far, far less clothing, dancing in cages and spinning around stripper poles. There was also a sado-masochism theme night, master-slave, leather and whips and all that jazz, which, by the way, happened to be my first day on the job as a full-time photographer.

Rewinding back, my first most vivid memory of music-photographercoming-of-age, for lack of a cornier phrase, was back in mid at Laundry Bar while freelancing with Chaswood which included other performance spaces like The Apartment and Republic Bar. Performing that night was Bunkface, Oh Chentaku and none other than living legends, Butterfingers, and what a glorious night it was.

And then there was the mighty Butterfingers to close the night. It was my first close encounter with a band I worshiped short of building a shrine to give daily thanks to Dear Leader and one that I quite literally grew up with since I was this snotty, pimpled-face 13 year old. It happens all the time. Not so much because I finally get to meet a long time idol, but how human he seems. Humble, gracious and genuinely passionate about what they do. It has been a constant source of inspiration, the never-say-die attitude, hard work, sacrifice and dedication the artistes, managers, crew, and the rest put into their craft.

Regardless of who or what they are, pretty much everyone is comrade-in-arms and rebels of the same cause. Something that — sad to say — is often lost in the materialist rat race of the wider capitalist community. It is this spirit that must always be remembered; of people coming together for a single cause, of collective celebration of joy, and our innate capacity to create artistic expressions of beauty, meaning and purpose. As Robert E. The truth is this: the march of Providence is so slow, our desires so impatient, the work of progress is so immense, and our means of aiding it so feeble, the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged.

It is history that teaches us to hope. Like a foot soldier in a trench between two wars of the utmost beautiful kind, two episodes of a heartwarming story, two lovers stuck in that Twilight Zone limbo of post-quarrel and pre-make up sex. I was a witness to these moments, and more.

I was both creator and participator, detached yet connected at the same time. I was a part of it but standing apart, invisible yet known. An enlightening dissonance, a unique dichotomy, one might say. Though it should be known that the photographer and the camera are only mediums by which these moments are immortalized and passed on for all the rest to bear witness. Although photography generates works that can be called art — it requires subjectivity, it can lie, it gives aesthetic pleasure — photography is not, to begin with, an art form at all.

Like language, it is a medium in which works of art among other things are made. Danial Radzmi 71 In a rather poetic way to put it, photographs do not create art but instead pays homage to works of art. Nevertheless, the visual portrayal of music is merely part of a larger chronicle, both of which — sounds and sight — tell stories, though in different ways.

Art and thought. Who are we? What does a Malaysian song sound like? How does it move and in what way? What does it look like? There need not be an absolute, final answer. What matters more is the journey towards unity and piecing together this fragmented creative landscape we have today. And there are some stories that we must never forget. So, what stories have I crafted these past brief years? Let me rephrase that —what stories have I found and captured?

What do my images, and those of others, talk about? What do they speak of? Why, immortality, of course. In the same way why stars are beautiful, looking at a still photo is looking at the past. Photography captures the death of a moment and gives a sobering reminder that the end is nigh. Everything becomes that much more meaningful because it is doomed.

Thanks to the advances of science and technology, it has become easier today to preserve such precious memories and stories, and the first time in the history of humanity that we are accorded with such a gift. Danial Radzmi 72 Oftentimes, expressions of an art form — be it a song, an album cover, a music video, a picture of a band mid-show on stage — need not be neither complex nor deep. Sometimes, it is simply memorable. This chapter marks the death of my brief career as a music photographer, but the images captured will live on.

Before, I wrote with light. Today, I write these words. He has also performed with the likes of Zee Avi, Rendra Zawawi, and many more. In my current position, I am neither a success story, nor am I failure. Even though I have been in the music industry for 6 years, I do not believe I have the right to preach of it as if I know it so well. The fact is that, the music industry is ever changing and the only thing I can do is to tell you of what I know best - my own story.

Hello, my name is David Rafael Buri. I have always loved music. Ever since I was a young boy, music was always a big part of my life. My mother would put on some Latin tunes and we would just groove and dance to the sound of the beat. Our family never really lived a moment without music.

This became an inspiration to why I wanted to pick up an instrument. I wanted to play guitar. I wanted to make music. I constantly had these melodies in my head that needed to be translated into reality. But sadly, I never did pick up an instrument during my young age.

Growing up in the small urban town of Miri, Sarawak, I thought musicianship was David Buri 75 only for those who had special talent. Though I did admire anyone who could play even a single chord, I did not think I would ever be good enough to learn how to play myself. This is a town that sold chicken rice for RM2.

Seeing a Fender guitar for RM1, seemed like a lot of money in comparison to everything else around. To me, anyone who owned a guitar, let alone an electric guitar, was rich and very talented. Schools at that time did not really support the creative medium either. The music and arts classes were always substituted for mathematics or something else. Even if we did have music class, the only instrument we were actually learning was the Recorder, or better yet, the Triangle.

With all these reasons in mind, music became nothing more than something I would listen to. At the age of 14, though, everything changed. My family moved. My father was able to get a job in the Netherlands. I started attending an American international high school. As much as everyone hates the United States, I will be forever grateful for this shift in my life that actually propelled me to what I would be doing later on. The American system, unlike the British, was very creative based.

They taught about balance and of how students should excel academically as well as creatively. With this in mind, my paradigm completely shifted and I began to learn things I thought I never would. I was in love. This was a whole new world for me.

This was a culture I thought only existed on TV shows. I started hanging around the creative kids. They basically gave a crash course on Rock music and I took it all in. These kids were talented. I would watch as a 14 year old would flawlessly perform an Yngwie Malmsteen song. I spent the afternoons watching high school bands perform rock songs perfectly.

I met opera singers, soul singers, jazz guitarists - everyone. David Buri 76 I was inspired to say the least. I wanted to play music. I wanted to be a part of this musical movement and play with the rest. I found my passion and with the help, motivation and encouragement of others, I was determined to be a musician. And so, I picked up my first acoustic guitar when I was 15 years old. Every day I would come home and practice for six hours straight. It actually came to a point where I started to bring my guitar to school and play during recess — just so I could have an extra 20 minutes a day to practice.

I was determined and well-disciplined. I even had this little rat race going on in my head. I needed to be as good as or even better than everyone in my school. I wanted to be the best guitarist around. This thought by itself motivated me even more. By the time I was 16, I bought my first electric guitar. It was a kit guitar with a mini amp. The brand was a Hyundai yes, just like the car.

It was the only thing I could afford, but it worked. I started soloing and practicing even more. I learnt scales, chords, melodies, tricks — everything. All I did was study and practice. It helped as well that there was never anything good on TV and downloading videos at that time was more or less impossible.

I was never big into video games or sports, so there was never a distractive issue there. In the spring of , I joined my first band. It was a stupid name, but as a teenager, it was the coolest thing in the world. We performed wherever we could. We would play at parties and functions.

We would join every single Battle of the Bands and any other talent competition. We played at schools, halls, and anywhere else that gave us a chance. But all of that changed quickly. One day when the clouds were eerily dark, I made my way to school as usual. There was a silence in the air. Something felt wrong. During our second class, the dean of students walked into every room and asked all the students to quietly go to the auditorium. The teachers were David Buri 77 silent.

No smiles, no frowns. The eyes of a few were swollen, as if they were crying moments before. Once every student was seated, the principle slowly walked on stage. With a heavy heart, she began to speak. The hall was quiet. What she told us next was just unbelievable. Even until this day, it still feels so surreal.

On the 24th of October , our principle stood in front of the whole school, and told us that our drummer, our beloved friend, had tragically passed away in an accident that very morning. Just a few months from graduation, Nathan Bachman — bless his soul — was on his way to school when his motorcycle collided with another, ending his life.

The whole school was in shock. I never knew the feeling of not seeing someone again knowing they will never come back. I never thought that this would happen. It was a tragic end to a beautiful life. He was supposed to go to the Berkley School of Music. He wanted to become a professional sessionist. He definitely had the talent. He even spent his summer vacations at Berkley just to prep for university.

He had the dedication, the determination — the heart. And all this was taken away from him in a heartbeat. Midst the tears I shed, though, I started to realise something about myself. Nathan Bachman taught something valuable, a lesson that has stuck with me till this very day — pursue your dreams, no matter what they are. I was still adamant on being successful in my academics, as I actually wanted to become a mechanical engineer.

Playing guitar was just my hobby. I then realised that music was more than just another hobby. It was a passion. I wanted to be a musician. I wanted a career in this. I wanted to be a guitarist on stage and tour the world.

David Buri 78 For teaching me this, I thank you, Nathan. He was, and is my inspiration. So I decided that when I would return to Malaysia, I would break into the music scene. I will make it to the top. I will become a recording artist.

From then on, I spent the rest of my high school years focusing on music. I even gained a sense of popularity amongst my schoolmates. They knew me as the rocker. My juniors looked up to me; some even praising me for my skills and talent. This fueled my ego even more. My dreams got bigger. I then wanted the rock lifestyle. Such motivation. Get the girls. Get the booze. Live the celebrity lifestyle. I was excited. In the summer of , I moved back to Malaysia and I was ready to take it by storm.

Moving to Kuala Lumpur was new to me. We only visited it a few times when I was younger. So this again was a culture shock. I started meeting people, doing research on the scene, picking up random flyers and going to gigs so I could listen to the music out there. It freaked me out. The amount of talent was amazing. As an year-old boy, I got scared. But I wanted to prove myself. I was determined in doing so. And my big break serendipitously happened in I was taking a journalism course at that time and I needed to write an assignment based on local news.

I decided to write on the music scene. Jason Lo formerly of Fat Boys Records. David Buri 79 So one day I just strolled into the office and asked if I could see him. Zahid, the lead singer for Disagree was working hard at his desk. I needed to get my paper done so I asked if I could interview him instead. We went into the studio room and I began to conduct my interview. I asked him all about the industry and how it is in Malaysia.

Once the interview was over, I then mentioned how I wanted to break into the scene myself. But a few days later, he calls. He wanted me to audition as the last guitarist left the band. I was more than happy to audition — I was excited. So we practiced at their studio for a few months. We got to know each other more and more everyday and noticed that we had quite good chemistry amongst us.

We played a few of their old songs and the band introduced me to a few new ones. I was quite astounded by some of the new songs. I immediately went home and started writing guitar pieces for them. I wanted to show them how talented I was.

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